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Problems with regulation

In cases of poor glycemic control, make a blood glucose curve and check for other concurrent or underlying disorders.

  • Discuss the daily routine with the cat owner—are injections and meals correctly timed? See Feeding schedule.
  • Ask for a breakdown of exactly what the cat eats—perhaps the cat is receiving too many snacks or the incorrect diet. See Nutrition.

Factors thought to contribute to a poor response to insulin treatment:

In cases of a poor response to insulin therapy, it is important to rule out these factors first.

Incorrect storage of insulin or poor injection technique:

Ask owners to demonstrate how they inject their pet and check the following:

General questions:

  • Is the insulin being stored correctly?
  • Is the insulin being mixed properly?
  • Is the insulin being injected subcutaneously?
  • Is the injection site being correctly located?
  • Is the injection site being rotated?

If using a syringe:

  • How long has the vial been in use?
  • Is the correct dose being drawn up into the syringe?
  • Is a new syringe being used for each injection?
  • Have the air bubbles been removed from the syringe during dose measurement?

If using VetPen®:

  • Is the insulin cartridge inserted into the VetPen properly?
  • Have the air bubbles been removed from the VetPen cartridge?
  • Is a new needle being used for each injection?
  • Is the correct dose being chosen using the dose selector?
  • Is the release button being pushed down fully so that the dose selector returns to the start line?
  • Is the movement of the dose selector restricted by the way the VetPen is being held?
  • Is the needle being held in the skin for at least 5 seconds after the dose selector has returned to the start line?

See Proper handling and storage and delivery of Vetsulin for more information.